Four-Day Savannah Tour

Day 1 Savannah Maps, City Market, First African Baptist Church
Day 2, Part 1 Squares near Bay Street (Reynolds, Johnson, Wright)
Christ Church, City Hall, Old Chatham County Courthouse Owens-Thomas House exterior
Day 2, Part 2 Colonial Park Cemetery, Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Squares: Lafayette, Madison, Scottish Rite Temple
Day 2, Part 3 Pedicabs, Forsyth Park Fountain, Mickve Israel Synagogue, Volunteer Guards Armory, Forest Gump bench location, River Street and cobble stone story
Day 3 Pink House Restaurant, Savannah College of Art and Design, Cotton Exchange, Washington Gift Canons, Mercer-Williams House, Monterey Square, 
Chippewa Square, Presbyterian Church
Day 4 Savannah River features, Owens-Thomas House,
Kehoe House, Davenport House, Oaks in Warren Square

Day 2 in Savannah, Part 3 of 3
Pedicab, Fountain in Forsyth Park, River Street
April 22, 2012

Posted June 15, 2012,  2012 Herbert E. Lindberg

Again, I repeat the handy dandy map of the Historic District to help you easily refer to it as we continue our walking tour.  Click on it to open a copy in a separate tab so you can get to it with one click and no scrolling.

Savannah Historic District and Squares


Better late than never, on this morning our concierge clued us onto a Pedicab service provided by students of SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design -- more on this on a later page). This is the greatest service since sliced bread. The cabs hold two people, and students pedal them at about 5 to 10 miles/hr, perfect for exploring the 1.5 square miles of Historic Savannah. Their fee works out to about a dollar a minute, but it's on an honor system and you pay what you think is right for the time and distance you use them.   

By the time Mary and I had reached Madison Square we were getting mighty tired so, as planned, we gave Pedicab a call at 912-232-7900. Within minutes a pretty girl pedaling a cab arrived to pick us up for our final morning push on to Forsythe Park and its beautiful fountain.


I had the girl stop so I could photograph this beautiful section of street along Monterey square, on the left.
At the time I hadn't realized this was the street in front of the Mercer-Williams House, featured in the book.
I believe Mercer-Williams is the red house you see through trees on the right.

 

Another shot, which emphasizes the beautiful Spanish moss hanging from the trees.
(It's called Spanish moss because it reminded the natives of the bearded Spaniards who invaded their land.)


The pretty girl and Mary pass as I get ready to climb back into the cab.


One block later we arrive at Forsyth Park. The graduate student was a pleasure to have as our temporary companion.


Tunnel of trees leading to Forsyth Fountain.
The shrubs on each side are azaleas, but spring came early and we missed them.  See below.


This is a crude photograph of a professional photograph I bought in a Savannah gallery, to show you what we missed.


Crop zoom of my photograph above.


More fountain details.  It was created in 1858 and extensively restored in 1988.


Zoom from same spot to see details of swan and man-serpent spouts.


Side view.


Crop zoom of above photo.


The lady on top is hard to reach for upkeep.


Mickve Israel Synagogue on opposite side of Monterey Square, third oldest in America.

The historic sanctuary was designed by New York architect Henry G. Harrison and built in 1876 in pure neo-Gothic style, reflecting the fashionable architecture of the Victorian era. It is the only Gothic-style architecture synagogue in America. 


Volunteer Guards Armory, 340 Bull St., the first building restored by the Savannah College of Art and Design.


This is where Forest Gump (Tom Hanks) sat on a bench in the movie.


After a great lunch at b.Matthews, a bar/restaurant next door to Staybridge Suites on Bay Street, and a couple hours resting and reading,
we headed across Bay Street and down this ramp down to River Street to check out shops and restaurants.

There is a story to the paving stones in this ramp and other streets along the Savannah River.  Most trans-ocean sea traffic was to bring cotton and other products from Savannah back to London, so the ships had little cargo during the trip to Savannah. To compensate and keep the ships in balance, ballast rocks were put into their holds. These were unloaded in Savannah before reloading with cotton bales and other products. Rather than hauling them away, Savannahs used them to pave nearby roads. The shippers then decided they wanted to be paid for the rock but, rather than pay, Savannahs tossed them into the river which increased dredging cost for the shippers. It wasn't long before paving stones were once more free to take.


View west on River Street from the bottom of the L-shaped ramp.
The candy kitchen on the left was the biggest I've seen, with a huge variety of candies made right there. 

 

We wandered through the shops as we bought a few gifts, then ate at, what else, another great Southern restaurant.
I had shrimp and grits to compare with the same meal at two restaurants in Charleston.  All three were scrumptious.

Then we walked back up the ramp but this time continued up the stairs you see in the background. Very steep for a couple tired old folks.
The good news is that our hotel is just across Bay Street from the top of the stairs.

Four-Day Savannah Tour

Day 1 Savannah Maps, City Market, First African Baptist Church
Day 2, Part 1 Squares near Bay Street (Reynolds, Johnson, Wright)
Christ Church, City Hall, Old Chatham County Courthouse Owens-Thomas House exterior
Day 2, Part 2 Colonial Park Cemetery, Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Squares: Lafayette, Madison, Scottish Rite Temple
Day 2, Part 3 Pedicabs, Forsyth Park Fountain, Mickve Israel Synagogue, Volunteer Guards Armory, Forest Gump bench location, River Street and cobble stone story
Day 3 Pink House Restaurant, Savannah College of Art and Design, Cotton Exchange, Washington Gift Canons, Mercer-Williams House, Monterey Square, 
Chippewa Square, Presbyterian Church
Day 4 Savannah River features, Owens-Thomas House,
Kehoe House, Davenport House, Oaks in Warren Square

Continue to Day 3   |   Home Page