Four-Day Tour of Charleston

Day 1 First Walks Near Anchorage Inn at 26 Vendue Range: Exterior of the Inn, Waterfront Park and Fountain, 
St. Philips Episcopal Church, Cobblestone street, 
Pink House Gallery, Old Slave Mart Museum.
Day 2 Horse carriage tour of the Historic District: 
French Quarter and South of Broad Maps, South of Broad Mansions, Miles Brewton House, Two Meeting Street Inn, Calhoun Mansion, First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, George Washington Park, Circular Congregational Church, Horse-drawn Carriages.
Day 3, Part 1 Magnolia Gardens Plantation: Beautiful flowers, huge live oaks and cypress trees hung with Spanish Moss, black reflecting marsh ponds, signature plantation bridge.
Day 3, Part 2 Magnolia Gardens Plantation: Slave quarters, alligator in marsh, across marsh reeds to the woods, moss close-up, magnificently spreading tree, plantation mansion from several angles, expansive views from its veranda.
Day 4, Part 1 Self-guided tour in the French Quarter:
French Quarter Map, Old Exchange House, St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Washington Park, Postal Museum, City Hall, Charleston County Courthouse, Interior of St. Michael's Church, George Washington's Pew 43
Day 4, Part 2 Self-Guided Walking Tour South of Broad:
South of Broad Map, Cemetery at St. Michael's Episcopal Church, First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, Tourists in carriages, Calhoun House alley, Huge tree at Two Meeting Street Inn, West Point Gardens: Gazebo, Cannons, 1775 Army of Revolution Monument, Massive array of sailboats.

Home Page

Charleston, Day 2
Horse carriage tour of the Historic District:
French Quarter and South of Broad Maps, South of Broad Mansions,
Miles Brewton House, Two Meeting Street Inn, Calhoun Mansion,
First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, George Washington Park,
Circular Congregational Church, Horse-drawn Carriages.

April 17, 2012

Posted July 11, 2012,  2012 Herbert E. Lindberg

By our second day in Charleston the cold that Mary caught from me had blossomed to the point that she decided to go back to bed after breakfast instead of joining me on a horse carriage tour.

 

I walked from Anchorage Inn (red circled A on this map) north on East Bay St. and then west on Market St. to Anson St. where several horse carriage services are available.  Click on the map to open a copy in a separate tab for handy reference.


The carriage toured the French Quarter and also "South of Broad," 
where many of Charleston's most luxurious mansions are located.
Click on the map to open a copy in a separate tab for handy reference.


I was seated on the very last row of the carriage, so couldn't take pictures looking straight forward.  On the other hand, I had the seat to myself so could slide from one side to the other as we approached interesting sights.  Soon after the carriage left the shop I reached out the right side and shot forward to capture St. Philip's Episcopal Church (seen from another side on the Day 1 page).  A less cluttered version of this picture is last on the present page.


Interesting example of Charleston architecture and trees.


Rooftop viewing rooms and twin curved stairs are popular in both Charleston and Savannah.  This mansion is at 37 King Street and is for sale at $5.9 M.


Another shot of same house, to better show the twin stairs.  We were told these date back to long hoop skirts which women had to lift up to climb stairs.  Women went up one stairway while men went up the other to avoid looking under skirts.


The Miles Brewton House, 27 King Street, Number 29 on the South of Broad map, is another stately mansion but of different style. Built circa 1769, it is considered to be one of the finest Georgian Palladian houses in America, and is still owned by the descendants of original owner and slave trader Miles Brewton.  One noted architect calls it the "finest town house of the colonial period."  The "Charleston double house" features ornate marble steps and platform, and an elliptical fanlight.  In 1822 after reports of an attempted slave uprising, a vast wrought iron barrier of "cheveaux- de-frise" was added. It was used as a military headquarters during the Civil War. The history and stories of the house and its residents are numerous and legendary.


Two Meeting Street Inn, corner of Meeting Street and South Battery Street, across from White Point Gardens (South of Broad map). 


Close-up of flowering tree and flag in the previous photo. 


Same building, from around the corner on Meeting Street.


Interesting Charleston architecture. 


The Calhoun Mansion, 14-16 Meeting Street, Number 28 on the South of Broad map. The land upon which this Italianate manor house was built was originally part of the plot of the Lowndes House, property of Gov. Charles Pinckney, and the site of three visits by George Washington in 1791.  Recognized as one of the greatest post-Civil War homes on the Eastern Seaboard, the Calhoun Mansion is the largest residence in Charlston with 24,000 square feet, 35 rooms, 14-foot ceilings, a grand ballroom, 35 fireplaces, and a 75-foot high domed ceiling in the stairwell. After a succession of owners, the house gradually deteriorated, was condemned in 1972, and finally saved and renovated over the past 25 years.


Another view from the same side.  Note that the ceilings of the porches are painted blue (common practice) to look like sky.  The theory is that blue sky gives bugs less feeling of security so they avoid the porches.  The long direction of almost all the porches in South of Broad face the shore, so onshore breezes flow through the porches and keep them cool.


First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, circa 1814; 53 Meeting Street, Number 30 on the South of Broad map.  This church was organized in 1731 by 12 Scottish families.  The first structure on this site was built in 1734.  The current building was con- structed in 1814, making it the fifth oldest church building in Charleston.  The building features twin towers capped by domes and a partially recessed portico.  In 1863 the congregation voted to donate their bells to the Confederacy, and they were not replaced until 1999.  The window over the main entrance displays the seal of the Church of England, and because it survived a fire in 1945, the seal's motto, "Nevertheless it was not consumed," is all the more poignant.


Ground level view of the portico.


I'd love to learn more about this home and its architecture. 


Washington Park and the George Washington Statue historical marker.


The Circular Congregational Church, circa 1892; 150 Meeting Street, Number 20 on the French Quarter map.  This is only the fourth church to have stood on this location since its inception in 1681.  Meeting Street takes its name from the first church on this site, which was dubbed "The White Meeting House."  Services were disrupted during the 1780-1782 occupation of Charleston as the British used the church as a hospital for their wounded.  The great fire of 1861 claimed the third church.  For over 20 years the ruins sat on Meeting Street until it was demolished in the earthquake of 1886.  As many bricks as possible were salvaged from the ruins to build the present church in 1892.

Visit the link above and view their 6-minute video for a bit of crucial and interesting history, and an excellent summary of their current approach and activities.  A small, local Congregational church in Chicago is where my mother, Dorothy Myrtle Slack-Lindberg, was very active throughout her life, and encouraged me to become a Junior Deacon, which I was until I drove to California in June, 1952.


Carriage at barn and repair shop just after our return.  I sat in the rearmost seat.  Our driver / guide is still on board.


This horse and carriage passed just as I began my walk back to Anchorage Inn.


Closer view of the typical Old South Carriage, driver/guide, and passengers.


Still another picture of St. Philip's Episcopal Church, now with a carriage for atmosphere.  I edited out most of the maze of poles and power lines that were on the right and crisscrossed the church.

Four-Day Tour of Charleston

Day 1 First Walks Near Anchorage Inn at 26 Vendue Range: Exterior of the Inn, Waterfront Park and Fountain, 
St. Philips Episcopal Church, Cobblestone street, 
Pink House Gallery, Old Slave Mart Museum.
Day 2 Horse carriage tour of the Historic District: 
French Quarter and South of Broad Maps, South of Broad Mansions, Miles Brewton House, Two Meeting Street Inn, Calhoun Mansion, First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, George Washington Park, Circular Congregational Church, Horse-drawn Carriages.
Day 3, Part 1 Magnolia Gardens Plantation: Beautiful flowers, huge live oaks and cypress trees hung with Spanish Moss, black reflecting marsh ponds, signature plantation bridge.
Day 3, Part 2 Magnolia Gardens Plantation: Slave quarters, alligator in marsh, across marsh reeds to the woods, moss close-up, magnificently spreading tree, plantation mansion from several angles, expansive views from its veranda.
Day 4, Part 1 Self-guided tour in the French Quarter:
French Quarter Map, Old Exchange House, St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Washington Park, Postal Museum, City Hall, Charleston County Courthouse, Interior of St. Michael's Church, George Washington's Pew 43
Day 4, Part 2 Self-Guided Walking Tour South of Broad:
South of Broad Map, Cemetery at St. Michael's Episcopal Church, First (Scots) Presbyterian Church, Tourists in carriages, Calhoun House alley, Huge tree at Two Meeting Street Inn, West Point Gardens: Gazebo, Cannons, 1775 Army of Revolution Monument, Massive array of sailboats.

Home Page

   Continue to Day 3   |   Home Page